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Plus-size model is term applied to an individual of average to larger stature (sometimes but not exclusively overweight or obese) who is engaged primarily in modeling plus-size clothing. Plus-size models also engage in work that is not strictly related to selling large-sized clothing, e.g., stock photography and advertising photography for cosmetics, household and pharmaceutical products and sunglasses, footwear and watches[citation needed]. Therefore, plus-size models do not exclusively wear garments marketed as plus-size clothing. This is especially true when participating in fashion editorials for mainstream fashion magazines.[citation needed]

Synonymous and interchangeable with plus-size model is “full-figured model”,[1] “extended-sizes model”, and “outsize model”.[2] Previously, the term “large size model” was also frequently used.[3][4]

Contents

Plus-size industry

Fashion designers are starting to look more closely at the earning potential from plus-size clothing, and have used plus-size models for their advertising campaigns and catwalks. Jean-Paul Gaultier and John Galliano both used plus-size models[5] in their Spring 2006 showings in Paris.[6] Gaultier also used plus-size models Marquita Pring and Crystal Renn in his Spring 2011 Ready to Wear show.[7][8] Italian plus-size fashion house Elena Mirò now regularly stages biannual prêt-à-porter shows during Fashion Week in Milan.[9] Mark Fast[10] and William Tempest[11] each used plus-size models during their own London Fashion Week showings for Spring 2009, and again as part of All Walks Beyond the Catwalk[12] event held on 19 September 2009 in association with the British Fashion Council. Mark Fast also used plus-size models in Fall 2010,[13] Fall 2011,[14] and Spring 2012.[15]

Origins in North America

 
A page from the Lane Bryant Spring/Summer 1954 catalog.

Lane Bryant began trading in the early 1900s as a producer of clothing for “Expectant Mothers and Newborn”‘.[16] By the early 1920s, Lane Bryant started selling clothing under the category ‘For the Stout Women’, which ranged between a 38–56 inch bustline.[16] The earliest catalogs used illustrations to sell their products, but by the mid-1950s photographs were integrated into the catalogs as the evolution of printing technology made this option available. After a hiatus through the 1960–1980 period, Lane Bryant again began using plus-size models.

Originally posted 2017-09-20 22:48:43.

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